Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/11147/14012
Title: Recycling of gas-to-liquid sludge as a potential organic amendment: Effect on soil and cotton properties under hyperarid conditions
Authors: Mabrouk, O.
Hamdi, H.
Sayadi, S.
Al-Ghouti, M.A.
Abu-Dieyeh, M.
Kogbara, R.
Al-Sharshani, A.
Keywords: Cotton growth
Gas-to-liquid sludge
Heavy metals
Hyperarid conditions
Soil enhancement
Carbon footprint
Composting
Cotton
Cultivation
Fertilizers
Gas emissions
Groundwater
Groundwater pollution
Organic carbon
Recycling
Risk assessment
Soil pollution
Soils
Sustainable development
Wastewater treatment
Condition
Cotton growth
Gas to liquids
Gas-to-liquid sludge
Hyperarid condition
Liquid sludge
Organic amendments
Soil enhancement
Soil property
Soil treatments
Heavy metals
fertilizer
phosphorus
soil organic matter
antioxidant
climate conditions
cotton
cultivation
landfill
phosphorus
soil organic matter
soil quality
wastewater treatment
animal experiment
antioxidant activity
Article
biosolid
carbon footprint
centrifugation
cow
field study
gas
Gossypium hirsutum
growing season
industrial sludge
liquid
manure
nonhuman
plant growth
plant parameters
recycling
sludge
soil
soil fertility
soil property
soil quality
soil treatment
water contamination
Issue Date: 2023
Publisher: Academic Press
Abstract: Gas-to-liquid (GTL) sludge is a specific wastewater treatment by-product, which is generated during the industrial process of natural gas conversion to transportation fuels. This least studied sludge is pathogen-free and rich in organic carbon and plant nutrients. Therefore, it can be reused for soil enhancement as a sustainable management strategy to mitigate landfill gas emissions. In this field study, we compared the performance of soil treatments with GTL sludge to the more conventional chemical fertilizers and cow manure compost for the cultivation of cotton under hyperarid conditions. After a complete growing season, GTL sludge application resulted in the enhancement of soil properties and plant growth compared to conventional inputs. As such, there was a significant dose-dependent increase of soil organic matter (4.01% and 4.54%), phosphorus (534 and 1090 mg kg−1), and cumulative lint yield (4.68 and 5.67 t ha−1) for GTL sludge application rates of 1.5% and 3%, respectively. The produced fiber quality was adequate for an upland cotton variety (Gossypium hirsutum var. MAY 344) and appeared more dependent on the prevailing climate conditions than soil treatments. On the other hand, the adverse effects generally related to industrial sludge reuse were not significant and did not affect the designed agro-environmental system. Accordingly, plants grown on GTL sludge-amended soils showed lower antioxidant activity despite significant salinity increase. In addition, the concentrations of detected heavy metals in soil were within the standards’ limits, which did not pose environmental issues under the described experimental conditions. Leachate analysis revealed no risks for groundwater contamination with phytotoxic metals, which were mostly retained by the soil matrix. Therefore, recycling GTL sludge as an organic amendment can be a sustainable solution to improve soil quality and lower carbon footprint. To reduce any environmental concerns, an application rate of 1.5% could be provisionally recommended since a two-fold increase in sludge dose did not result in a significant yield improvement. © 2023 Elsevier Ltd
URI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2023.119319
https://hdl.handle.net/11147/14012
ISSN: 0301-4797
Appears in Collections:PubMed İndeksli Yayınlar Koleksiyonu / PubMed Indexed Publications Collection
Scopus İndeksli Yayınlar Koleksiyonu / Scopus Indexed Publications Collection
WoS İndeksli Yayınlar Koleksiyonu / WoS Indexed Publications Collection

Show full item record



CORE Recommender

Page view(s)

8
checked on Feb 23, 2024

Google ScholarTM

Check




Altmetric


Items in GCRIS Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.