Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/11147/8893
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dc.contributor.authorDuran, Hasan Engin-
dc.contributor.authorFratesi, Ugo-
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-18T08:34:06Z-
dc.date.available2020-07-18T08:34:06Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.issn0017-4815-
dc.identifier.issn1468-2257-
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1111/grow.12351-
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11147/8893-
dc.descriptionFRATESI, UGO/0000-0002-0755-460Xen_US
dc.descriptionWOS: 000503756200001en_US
dc.description.abstractThe presence of cycles characterizes all economic systems, but economic cycles have differentiated spatial impacts. Some regions have broader cycles with respect to the country, while others tend to be less responsive to shocks and hence have narrower cycles. Being exposed to broader cycles, that is, greater volatility, may increase the strain on a regional economic system. This paper investigates the different responsiveness to cyclical forces and volatility of regions in the long run. It does so by using quarterly employment data for the Nuts2 Italian regions over almost 40 years before and during the period 1978-2016. Explored in particular are the cross-regional variations in employment volatility and the reasons for the patterns observed, as well as whether they have changed the following different macroeconomic policy regimes. The paper identifies the break dates of different regimes, and these regime changes will be related to policy modifications, such as the implementation of the European Monetary Union. The determinants of this regional volatility appear to be quite stable, so that the changes in volatility are explained by how these determinants have changed overtime and how they are unevenly distributed in space. In particular, the lagging regions of the country suffer, in addition to lower production and income, from higher volatility due to a structure which is weaker and more unstable. Volatility can hence be an additional issue for lagging regions.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley and Sons Inc.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofGrowth and Changeen_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen_US
dc.titleEmployment volatility in lagging and advanced regions: The Italian caseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.institutionauthorDuran, Hasan Engin-
dc.departmentIzmir Institute of Technology. City and Regional Planningen_US
dc.identifier.volume51en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.startpage207en_US
dc.identifier.endpage233en_US
dc.relation.publicationcategoryMakale - Uluslararası Hakemli Dergi - Kurum Öğretim Elemanıen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/grow.12351-
dc.relation.doi10.1111/grow.12351en_US
dc.coverage.doi10.1111/grow.12351en_US
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.openairetypeArticle-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
crisitem.author.deptDepartment of City and Regional Planning-
Appears in Collections:Scopus İndeksli Yayınlar Koleksiyonu / Scopus Indexed Publications Collection
WoS İndeksli Yayınlar Koleksiyonu / WoS Indexed Publications Collection
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