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dc.contributor.authorÜnlütürk, Sevcan
dc.contributor.authorAtılgan, Mehmet Reşat
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-25T06:54:22Z
dc.date.available2017-05-25T06:54:22Z
dc.date.issued2014-08
dc.identifier.citationÜnlütürk, S., and Atılgan, M.R. (2014). UV-C irradiation of freshly squeezed grape juice and modeling inactivation kinetics. Journal of Food Process Engineering, 37(4), 438-449. doi:10.1111/jfpe.12099en_US
dc.identifier.issn0145-8876
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1111/jfpe.12099
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11147/5604
dc.description.abstractUV inactivation kinetics of freshly squeezed turbid white grape juice (FSTGJ) treated with an annular flow UV reactor by applying UV dosages ranging from 0 to 116.7J/mL, at three different flow rates (0.90, 1.75 and 3.70mL/s), were modeled by using log-linear, Weibull, Hom and modified Chick-Watson models. FSTGJ was circulated five times in the UV system, i.e., UV exposure time was 20.33min during processing. The populations of Escherichia coli K-12, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and foodborne yeasts were reduced by 3.759, 4.133 and 1.604log cfu/mL, respectively, after exposure to UV dosage of 116.7J/mL at the lowest flow rate. The inactivation kinetics of foodborne yeasts were best described by the modified Chick-Watson model, with the least root mean squared error (RMSE=0.001, R2=0.999). Besides, the inactivation kinetics of E.coli K-12 and LAB were best fitted by Weibull model (R2=0.999). Additionally, when the UV exposure time was increased up to 32.5min (i.e., eight cycles), UV-C treatment of FSTGJ resulted in 5.341log cfu/mL reduction in E.coli K-12, which meets the Food and Drug Administration requirement of a 5log reduction of microorganisms in fruit juices. Practical Applications Consumer demand for high-quality fruit juice with fresh-like characteristics has markedly expanded in recent years. UV-C irradiation is a nonthermal method and allows the processing of fruit juices with a minimal or no changes in flavor, essential nutrients and vitamins. Although thermal pasteurization is the most convenient way of increasing the shelf life of fruit juices, it causes a "cook taste" in grape juice. So, in this study, the application of UV-C irradiation to process grape juice was investigated. The shape of the microbial inactivation curve is sigmoidal in UV treatment. Therefore, different kinetic models (e.g., log-linear, Weibull, Hom and modified Chick-Watson) are applied to describe the inactivation kinetics of Escherichia coli K-12, lactic acid bacteria and foodborne yeasts. Kinetic parameters (e.g., k and D) and models can be used for the development of UV-C irradiation process to ensure microbial safety in juice products.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipDepartment of Food Engineering, Izmir Institute of Technology, Izmir, Turkey (2010IYTE09)en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen_US
dc.relation.isversionof10.1111/jfpe.12099en_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen_US
dc.subjectBacteriaen_US
dc.subjectEscherichia colien_US
dc.subjectFlow rateen_US
dc.subjectFruit juicesen_US
dc.subjectInactivation kineticsen_US
dc.titleUV-C irradiation of freshly squeezed grape juice and modeling inactivation kineticsen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.contributor.authorIDTR44047en_US
dc.contributor.iztechauthorÜnlütürk, Sevcan
dc.contributor.iztechauthorAtılgan, Mehmet Reşat
dc.relation.journalJournal of Food Process Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.departmentİYTE, Mühendislik Fakültesi, Gıda Mühendisliği Bölümüen_US
dc.identifier.volume37en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.startpage438en_US
dc.identifier.endpage449en_US
dc.identifier.wosWOS:000339718300010
dc.identifier.scopusSCOPUS:2-s2.0-84904420851
dc.relation.publicationcategoryMakale - Uluslararası Hakemli Dergi - Kurum Öğretim Elemanıen_US


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